Karma

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Since the end of last years Summer Writing Project I have been thinking about what kind of story to enter this year.  I spent weeks, sometimes even months drafting up an idea only to drop it because it wasn’t quite right before finally settling on this one:

 Karma

Karma is a simple story about redemption.  It’s not a very original premise; it has been used in countless books, movies and plays.  There are many reasons I have chosen such an overused concept, but more on that later.  For now let us talk about the story itself.

It focuses primarily on two characters: Jack and Gwen.

Jack has spent his entire life looking out for number one (himself).  When he is killed in an accident, he finds himself in the afterlife, or more precisely, in limbo.  Unfortunately for him, if he wants to get into paradise, he must do a little ‘community service’ to make up for his heinous ways.  He is therefore assigned to help Gwen, a young woman who stands on the verge of a dark and difficult time in her life.

So, why did I choose this particular story?  Well, tales of redemption are so common because we can all relate to them.  We’ve all done things we wish we could undo.  That’s why Charles Dicken’s  A Christmas Carol has stayed relevant more than a century and a half after it was first published.  It has been retold and re-imagined countless times.

The theme of redemption is also a common core aspect in many tales too.  It spans all genres and has featured in pretty much every medium through which a story can be conveyed – you’ll find it in works ranging from The Bible right up to the video game God of War and beyond.

Don’t get the wrong idea, though.  While this story is far simpler than others I have written, it is by no means an easier road.  Such a powerful and universally felt subject matter will need to be done with finesse if I am to do it any justice.  It MUST be combined with characters who have real emotions and drives and dreams and fears and hopes.  A straight forward story like this has no room for error.  If something is even a little off, it has nothing to hide behind – no winding sub plots or expansive, epic worlds or even edgy/quirky concepts.  There is a reason why some tales of redemption echo through the ages while others are quickly forgotten; The simpler an idea, the more it tests a writers mettle.  That is the challenge I have set myself.

There’s not much more I can say except keep an eye out for further updates.  Oh – and good luck to all prospective entrants to this years contest.  We had some fantastic stories last year – those who won really deserved to do so.

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The Jukepop Reading Party

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During the SWP2015 I decided I would bulk read as many of the entries as I could (I had previously been tied up with my own entry).  The idea caught on and thus the JPRP was born!  I decided it would be neat to carry it forward.  Like many of you, I have countless serials on my bookshelf that I keep meaning to get round to but for one reason or another I just haven’t gotten there yet. The JPRP is a great chance to become familiar with different authors work and get through some of the titles that have been gathering virtual dust on your virtual bookshelf or even just get through more of a serial you haven’t finished yet.

With that in mind, I want to spread the word and get as many people as possible involved with the JPRP!  To help that along I thought I would clarify exactly what the JPRP is and what you should do if you decide to join in.


 

Q. What is the JPRP?

A: Basically it is a mass global group reading session.  Participants take the time to read through as many Jukepop serial chapters as they possibly can.

Q. Are there any rules?

A: Nope.  Just read as much as you can and be sure to vote.  If you feel so inclined, feedback is always appreciated but it isn’t mandatory.

Q: Is there a minimum amount I should read?

A: Absolutely not.  Just read whatever you can, even if it’s only one chapter.

Q: Am I supposed to read specific serials or work by specific authors?

A: No.  Read whatever serial tickles your fancy.  I usually aim to get through a serial that has been on my bookshelf for a long time or one that I have fallen behind on, but you can choose whichever you like.  It’s up to you.

Q: When is the JPRP?

A: The JPRP takes place on the last full week of every month, running from Monday-Sunday.  There is no specific time to start.  Just read what you can when you can.

Q: Why then?

A: Quite simply it is because it ties in with the JP30.  The aim is to support authors on JP but also to give them a little boost.  One or two extra votes can often mean the difference between second place and first place.

Q: Is it only JP authors who can participate?  What if I don’t have a story published on JP?

A: No, you do not have to be an author to take part.  Although most JP members are authors with work published on Jukepop, there are some who are content to read the vast catalogue of serials rather than submit their own work.  All you need is to be registered on Jukepop and be willing to read.  That’s it.

Q: Are there any prizes or incentives?

A: Only the satisfaction that you have helped and supported another human being.  I am considering issuing an award for whoever reads the most chapters each month but it will not take effect until March’s JPRP.

Q: Is this an official Jukepop initiative?

A: This is something I am running to encourage support.  It is not affiliated with Jukepop.


 

I hope this clears things up.  If you have any further questions regarding the JPRP, please leave me a comment!